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Easy Sourdough Flatbread & Why It’s Amazing

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At one point seven or eight years ago, I was a mom of one kid. I was all about making my own bread, muffins, bars, and treats so that our family could avoid processed ingredients. That was my first ever experience with sourdough starter. I made my own starter and used it to make bread on a regular basis. But back then, I didn’t know how many other baked goods and bread products I could make from that precious starter. One example is the easy sourdough flatbread I’m going to share with you at the end of this post!

Back in those days, I had more TIME! When things started getting a little too busy, well, my starter died. And I didn’t really know anyone else to help me revive/replenish it. So, I gave up on sourdough for the time being, thinking I’d pick it up again soon. It took a few years, but a friend gave me some starter that is providing us with even more nourishment than I knew it was capable of during my first stint with sourdough. Thanks to the internet, I’m also making way more goodness with it than I was before. That may have something to do with the fact that I now have 4 boys who do nothing but eat all day, but I digress.

So now you may be wondering, what is sourdough starter, why should I care (trust me, you will), and how do I get my hands on some so I can make this easy sourdough flatbread? Keep reading!

bubbly sourdough starter in glass bowl

What is sourdough starter made from?

Flour and water. It’s that simple. And yes, there are gut-enabling foods that you can make JUST from sourdough starter, with no added ingredients. Of course, the flour and water that we start with is transformed into fermented, bubbly goodness thanks to wild and beneficial yeasts and bacteria.

What’s so great about sourdough starter?

Anyone can mix up some flour and water. And although those are the only ingredients in sourdough starter, the difference is the fermentation process. If you’d like a more thorough lesson on fermentation, I recommend going here. But here is the quick version:

  1. Water is added to a food and placed in anaerobic conditions (that means no oxygen).
  2. Beneficial microorganisms are given life by sitting out on the counter with no refrigeration.
  3. These microbes break down sugars and starches into alcohols and acids.

On its own, the typical wheat flour that you buy at the store is lacking in nutrients. The important thing to know here is that those newly-created alcohols and acids give sourdough starter a far superior nutritional content. This is in comparison to the original product of flour and water.

By eating fermented foods we keep our gut (gastrointestinal tract) healthy. There is a lot of research that has shown correlation between the gut and overall health. Fermenting the flour gives you a probiotic benefit. Many people who have difficulty digesting grains actually find that long-fermented sourdough products are easily digestible. So by eating sourdough products, you are aiding your digestive process and keeping harmful bacteria in check!

Eat bread for my health? Don’t mind if I do.

If you can’t find starter from a friend, you can make your own. It’s actually a much easier process than you might think.

fresh rustic sourdough bread

How do I make sourdough starter?

  1. Mix 1 cup flour and 1 cup filtered water and stir thoroughly. Using filtered water should not be necessary once your starter is established.
  2. Place a clean tea towel over the bowl and let sit for 24 hours.
  3. The next day, discard half of the mixture.
  4. Repeat the process by adding 1 cup flour and 1 cup filtered water.
  5. Repeat steps 1-4 for about 5 days.
  6. After that, discard and feed your starter every 12 hours for 2-3 more days.

After at least a week has gone by and you have followed these steps, you should have a bubbly starter ready to make bread, pancakes, or any other sourdough goodies you may want to try.

Now that we know how a starter is made, I want to give you a super easy, no-wait recipe to try as soon as that starter of yours is mature! Make this for your family, and I promise you won’t be disappointed! It makes a quick an excellent side dish, lunch, or snack.

Easy Sourdough Flatbread Recipe

easy cheesy sourdough flatbread topped with fresh basil

Ingredients:

  • 1-1.5 cups sourdough starter
  • 1/2 cup cheddar cheese, shredded
  • 1/2 cup mozzarella or provolone cheese, shredded
  • 1 tbsp butter or olive oil
  • 1 tsp garlic powder
  • 1/2 tsp course salt or sea salt
  • Fresh or dried herbs of your choice (I love using rosemary and basil)
easy sourdough flatbread prebake with spaghetti sauce

Instructions:

  1. Place a pizza stone or cast iron skillet in a cold oven and heat to 450 degrees.
  2. Once the stone and oven is preheated, take out your stone and brush with a thin layer of olive oil or butter. I definitely prefer olive oil for this step.
  3. Pour sourdough starter directly onto hot stone and spread into desired shape. Work somewhat quickly because the flatbread will start cooking on contact! You can do a round shape or something a little more square if you prefer.
  4. Sprinkle with salt, garlic powder, and herbs, if desired.
  5. Bake for 10 minutes.
  6. Remove from oven and brush with additional butter or olive oil. Top with cheese.
  7. Broil on low setting for 2-3 minutes or until cheese is melted/browned to your liking.
  8. Cut into rectangles or triangles using a pizza cutter. Serve!
easy sourdough flatbread with cheese on top

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I have so much more I could say on sourdough starter, because I am that much of a fan. This post is just a basic introduction. I hope you enjoy the bonus recipe! If you would like a printable version, click “Print Recipe” below!

5 from 2 votes

Easy Cheesy Sourdough Flatbread

Made with JUST sourdough starter, this restaurant style cheesy garlic flatbread is both crowd-pleasing and gut-pleasing!
Print Recipe
Prep Time:10 minutes
Cook Time:10 minutes

Equipment

  • Pizza stone or cast iron skillet
  • Pizza Cutter

Ingredients

  • 1-1.5 cups sourdough starter
  • 1 tbsp olive oil or butter
  • 1 tsp garlic powder
  • 1/2 tsp course salt or sea salt
  • 1/2 cup cheddar cheese shredded
  • 1/2 cup mozzarella or provolone cheese shredded
  • Fresh or dried herbs

Instructions

  • Place a pizza stone or cast iron skillet in a cold oven and heat to 450 degrees.
  • Once the stone and oven is preheated, take out your stone and brush with a thin layer of olive oil or butter. I definitely prefer olive oil for this step.
  • Pour sourdough starter directly onto hot stone and spread into desired shape. Work somewhat quickly because the flatbread will start cooking on contact! You can do a round shape or something a little more square if you prefer.
  • Sprinkle with salt, garlic powder, and herbs, if desired.
  • Bake for 10 minutes.
  • Remove from oven and brush with additional butter or olive oil. Top with cheese.
  • Broil on low setting for 2-3 minutes or until cheese is melted/browned to your liking.
  • Cut into rectangles or triangles using a pizza cutter. Serve!
Course: Side Dish
Cuisine: American
Keyword: cheese bread, cheesy bread, easy bread, easy garlic bread, flatbread, sourdough, sourdough flatbread, sourdough starter
Servings: 4
Calories: 270kcal

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how to make sourdough starter pin image with easy cheesy sourdough flatbread

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6 Comments

  1. I have been saying forever that I was going to try this recipe. I’ve saved the recipe. I plan to start the process tomorrow ☺️. Wish me luck!

  2. Why do you discard half of what you make? Why can’t you take the other half and do another starter? Yea, it might multiply kinda fast but you can trade with people for breads already made or anything or maybe it can be frozen?

    1. You absolutely can do what you’re talking about during the getting started phase. You will just end up with a lot of separate jars of starter that are at different stages. Now that my starter is established, I never actually discard because there are so many things you can do with it. And you can still use starter discard when you are establishing a new starter, there are lots of recipes out there!